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K - Multiscale Simulations of Catastrophic Phenomena: Toward Bridging between Materials Fracture and Earthquake

Organizers

Takahiro Hatano
(The University of Tokyo, Japan)
Masanori Kohyama
(AIST, Japan)
Ferenc Kun
(University of Debrecen, Hungary)
Tomoaki Niiyama
(Kanazawa University, Japan)
Masatake Yamaguchi
(JAEA, Japan)
Momoji Kubo
(Tohoku University, Japan)

Description

Mechanisms and principles of atomistic and microscopic materials fracture may have common features and characteristics with those of various huge catastrophic phenomena in the real world such as earthquake, avalanche snow-slide, volcanic eruption, destruction of large civil engineering structures, and so on. Historically, materials fracture has been studied by continuum mechanics, and recently atomistic simulation approach for the materials fracture has gained much attention. On the other hand, earthquake has been also studied in the framework of continuum mechanics, however there are huge time-scale and length-scale differences between materials fracture and earthquake. Thus, the basic science of materials fracture and earthquake are much different. Until now, the precise relationship between materials fracture and earthquake has not been well discussed. The advancement of the recent multiscale simulation technologies may enable to reveal the generality, commonality, dissimilarity, etc. of the mechanisms and principles between materials fracture and earthquake. Surely, we have to consider the huge gap in both time-scale and length-scale between materials fracture and earthquake, and we also have to take into account the stochastic features in such catastrophic phenomena. However, this issue is a hot subject in the theory and multiscale simulation in the present day. We may obtain new technologies for preventing materials fracture from the scientific knowledge on the relationship between materials fracture and catastrophic natural disasters. Therefore, this symposium focuses on the theoretical and computational researches to discuss the generality, commonality, dissimilarity, etc. between materials fracture and earthquake. Our symposium also focuses on the multiscale simulation approaches on atomistic and microscopic material fracture as well as various catastrophic natural disasters such as earthquake, avalanche snow-slide, volcanic eruption, destruction of large civil engineering structures, etc. We also welcome each time-scale and each length-scale researches in the fields of material fracture and catastrophic natural disasters in addition to the multi-scale approaches for accelerating the discussion on the future direction and development in this field.

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
- Theoretical or simulation approach for discussions on the generality, commonality, dissimilarity, etc. of the mechanisms and principles between materials fracture and earthquake.
- Multiscale simulation approach to bridge the large gap in time-scale and length-scale between materials fracture and catastrophic natural disasters (earthquake, avalanche snow-slide, volcanic eruption, destruction of large civil engineering structures, etc.).
- Stochastic approach to catastrophic fracture phenomena in materials, artificial structures, and earthquakes.
- Simulations of initiation, growth and propagation of cracks or failure in materials, base rock, or earth’s crust.
- Multiscale simulation approach from atomic-scale to macro-scale in materials failure and fracture.
- Multiscale simulation approaches to various catastrophic natural disasters such as earthquake, avalanche snow-slide, volcanic eruption, destruction of large civil engineering structures, etc.
- Each time-scale and each length-scale researches in the fields of material fracture and catastrophic natural disasters in addition to the multi-scale approaches for the discussion on the future direction and development of the multiscale approaches.

Invited speakers

Ian Main
(University of Edinburgh, UK)
Karin Dahmen
(University of Illinois, USA)
Akihiro Nakatani
(Osaka University, Japan)